7 Myths and the Truth About Learning Challenges

Briana Hurst ADD / ADHD, Anxiety, Asperger’s Syndrome, Attention, Auditory Processing, Autistic Spectrum, Classroom, Comprehension, Core Learning Skills, Developmental delays, Dysgraphia, Dyslexia, Executive Function, General Information, Homeschool, Homework, IEP, Learning disabilities, Math and Dyscalculia, Primitive Reflexes, Processing Speed, Reading, School, Sensory Processing, Social Skills, Spelling, Sports, Writing 0 Comments

Myth #1:  People with learning challenges just aren’t that smart.

Truth:  By definition, students with learning disabilities have average to above average intelligence.  This is why it is so frustrating and confusing for all involved when otherwise typical students struggle in school

Myth #2:  Students who struggle in school are just lazy.

Truth:  After multiple failures, a student may give up, but in my experience, laziness is NEVER the real reason for the struggle.

Myth #3:  They just don’t care.  They’re not motivated.

Truth:  Students who struggle may adopt an attitude of boredom or not caring, but they care deeply and would not choose to fail if they had the skills to do the job.

Myth #4:  If you’re not diagnosed with a learning disability, ADHD, or dyslexia, you don’t have a problem.

Truth:  Research indicates that 30% of the population has some degree of difficulty with the auditory skill that supports reading.  Only 5 – 9% actually get diagnosed as having a learning disability.  That leaves about 20% of students undiagnosed but struggling to some degree.

Myth #5:  With time, students will grow out of a learning challenge.

Truth:  In most cases, this simply is not true.  Children with learning challenges may become better at hiding or compensating for their challenges, but time alone does not eliminate the problems.

Myth #6:  The best way to deal with a learning challenge is to work around it; to learn to compensate for it.

Truth: Neuroscience research has proven that the brain can change. It is a crime to assume that these high potential children and adults must spend their lives compensating for their challenges.  The brain, and therefore learning challenges, can change.

Myth #7:  A learning problem is a permanent condition

Truth:  Brain research in the last 3 decades has proven that with targeted and intensive cognitive training, the brain can develop new, more efficient, and permanent connections for learning and processing information.

 

If you know or work with someone with a learning or attention challenge, here are 2 events for you:

Parent Information Night Learn why some smart kids struggle and what can be done to change it permanently.  Click here for details and RSVP: http://learningdisability.com/parent-info-night/.

 

SLC Grand Re-opening:  Stowell Learning Center Irvine

April 22, 2017 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

  • Try out cutting-edge techniques our students use
  • Tour our beautiful new facility
  • Special activities for kids / childcare
  • Student art display
  • Scholarship drawings and raffle
  • Free FOOD Truck Lunch

SIMULATIONS:  Experience what it feels like to have dyslexia, auditory processing, or attention challenges

SPEAKER:  Jill Stowell

7 Myths and the Truth About Learning Challenges:

Understanding and Supporting Struggling Students

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

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