Hooray For Dads!

Jill Stowell General Information, Learning Disability

DAD

Last weekend was Father’s Day, and so, naturally, I was thinking about my dad. Good memories.

When I was growing up, my dad was very supportive, but was never really involved with my homework because homework was done and dinner ready by the time he got home from work.

For many years after I started the Learning Center, I dealt almost exclusively with moms. Dad’s didn’t seem as involved in their children’s schooling and homework, and in fact, they notoriously felt that if their struggling students would just try harder, they would do just fine.

 

These days, I get the privilege of seeing lots of dads (and grand-dads) at Parent Information Nights, in the waiting room, and sitting-in on sessions. They are very involved in their kids’ education and homework and they “get it.” Some through personal experience.

Previously, we have talked about the “gifts” and talents associated with the dyslexic thinking style. We have many SLC dads who have put these talents to work by creating their own very successful businesses.

 

But they also carry some scars, because being smart, creative, and innovative but struggling in school is confusing and just plain hard. And these dads don’t want their kids to have to suffer as they did.

So today, I just want to appreciate all the dads and grandfathers.
Your support, understanding, and presence are
absolutely invaluable in your kids lives!

And a very special thank you to those who are making the investment of time and finances to help correct their child’s or teen’s learning challenges. We know that this is a big commitment for any family, but it is truly an investment in the child’s future.

Do you want to better understand your child’s learning or attention challenges and what can be done to make a real change?

Join us for a FREE Parent Information Meeting.

Click here for details and RSVP: http://learningdisability.com/parent-info-night/.

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

 

Some Random Thoughts About Dad

Jill Stowell Classroom, Development, Executive Function, General Information, Homeschool, Homework, IEP, Learning Disability, Mental Health

Whenever I stand on the edge of a lake or river, I find myself picking up small, flat rocks to skip across the water.  I

have a very special memory of my dad teaching me to skip rocks at Yellowstone Lake when I was probably 7 or 8 years old.

Father’s Day is coming up, so first and foremost, Happy Father’s Day to all the dads!

Dad’s Like FUN!

Many dads kid that they are just little boys at heart.  They need their toys and play time.  There are some lessons to be learned there for students, especially those who struggle in school.

When school is difficult, it may not be a whole lot of fun for kids.  They often miss recess or playtime at home just trying to get their work completed.  Parents find it frustrating that their child won’t just sit down and get his homework done rather than dragging it out all afternoon.

Maybe what the brain needs is a break – a little bit of fun, laughter, or movement – to re-energize it.  Parents can structure Brain Breaks so that kids get the little reboot that they need without losing their momentum with homework.  Try something like:

  • Going outside and shooting (attempting) 5 baskets a piece
  • Turning on music and doing silly dances for 5 minutes
  • Chase the dog around the yard for 5 minutes
  • Play a 5 minute game of UNO or some other quick, fun, card game
  • Have a Stacking Cups competition

These little Brain Breaks are a fun way to spend a few minutes together in a positive way, change attitudes, and increase energy.  If a student knows he has a 5-minute Brain Break to look forward to at the end of the task, it may increase his motivation and productivity.

Boys Need Approval

Boys need approval.  Little boys, big boys, boys who have grown up to be dads – they tend to be hard on themselves and operate best with approval.  Boys won’t generally play a game they don’t think they can win, but they do like to play games.

Try breaking challenging tasks into small little competitions that the student can win:

  • We just did this stack of flashcards in 2 minutes. Let’s do them one more time and see if you can beat your time!
  • You got 9 of these math facts correct last time. How many do you think you can get this time?

Validate the performance:

  • When you wrote out this answer, your words gave me a really good mental picture!
  • Wow! These three words are the stars of the page. They are so neat and easy to read!
  • That was a good connection that you made between those two events in the story.
  • Asking your teacher to clarify the assignment shows maturity and that you’re taking responsibility for your work. I’m really proud of you!

Many of our boys won’t take a compliment, but they feel proud of an accomplishment that is noted specifically.  And, that validation will encourage them to repeat it!

Dad’s Like to Nap

My dad loved taking a nap on a Sunday afternoon.  I often find my husband “watching a game on TV” AKA napping on the weekend.   I think a lot of dad’s enjoy a good nap.

Personally, I find it really hard to nap.  It makes me feel like I’m being lazy.

I think there are some real misconceptions about the word lazy – especially in light of learning and attention problems.

I heard the mom of a 3 ½ year old boy with unclear and limited speech say that he was just being lazy.

What I have found is that people of any age do not want to fail or be misunderstood.  Children with speech or learning problems do not have them because they are lazy.  They have them because there are underlying skills that are not supporting them well enough.  In the case of speech and reading issues, the problem is often rooted in weak auditory processing of sounds.  If the brain cannot think about all of the sounds in words, it will be difficult, if not impossible, to reproduce and decode those sounds when speaking and reading.

Parents who find themselves describing their child as lazy, need to explore the real root of the problem.  Lazy can be a symptom, but is almost never the reason why a student struggles.

Do you or your child struggle with speaking, reading, learning, or attention?  These challenges can be changed.  While there are no simple, overnight solutions, most learning and attention challenges can be dramatically improved or completely corrected through developing the weak underlying skills and remediating the affected academic areas.  Ready for a change??

JOIN US for a FREE Information Night

For information and RSVP go to www.learningdisability.com

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

 

All Kinds of Talents, All Kinds of Minds

Jill Stowell Classroom, Development, General Information, Homeschool, Homework, IEP, Learning disabilities, Learning Disability, School

9I’m writing this on Memorial Day, a holiday that many of us value as a day off we get to spend with our families, but also a day to remember, with tremendous gratitude, the soldiers who have given their lives for their country and freedom.

I got to thinking about what it takes to be a soldier – the physical and mental toughness, the ability to follow orders, the quick visual awareness, the bravery and stamina.

It takes a special kind of person.

In reality, it takes all kinds of minds, all kinds of personalities and talents to make the world function well.  And thankfully so.  Life would be pretty boring if we were all exactly the same.

Our learning center is full of kids, teens, and adults with all kinds of minds and all kinds of potential.  The common denominator for most is that in spite of being smart, their struggles with learning or attention have kept them from reaching that potential.

Academic skills are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to learning.  There are many, many underlying processing/learning skills that provide the foundation for easy, efficient learning.  These underlying skills should be working so automatically for us, that no extra effort or energy is being siphoned off in order to sit in a chair, listen, pay attention, easily see and decipher words on the page, or communicate our ideas.

Inefficient underlying processing/learning skills

can cause even very smart students to struggle in school.

What is proven through research and what we know through 30 years of experience is that the brain can change.  Weak underlying skills can be developed – the brain can be retrained to process information more efficiently.  Most learning and attention challenges can be dramatically improved or completely corrected so that students can reach their innate potential.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with a learning or attention challenge and you’re ready to change that permanently,

JOIN US for a FREE Parent Information Night

For information and RSVP go to www.learningdisability.com

 

Enjoy Family and Remember our Troops This Week

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers