I Want My Happy Child Back!

Briana Hurst Classroom, Development, General Information, Homework, IEP, Learning disabilities, Learning Disability, Poor grades, School 0 Comments

I HATE shrimp – especially the tiny ones used to make shrimp cocktail.  I hate how they look, how they smell, how they feel in my mouth, and how they taste.  I have a visceral reaction to shrimp, and needless-to-say, as an adult, I NEVER eat them.

At our Parent Information Night last week, a parent shared that her smart, athletic, social 10 year old has a visceral reaction to learning. He HATES anything related to reading, writing, math, or schoolwork.

So what is it all about when an otherwise capable, accomplished child or adult responds this way?  Is this laziness? Stubbornness?  Defiance?  Lack of motivation?  Most likely not.

Smart kids who struggle with learning or attention know they are struggling – even at a young age.  They can look around the classroom and see that everyone else is finished before they are; that their grades are not as good; that while others get to go out to recess, they have to stay in to finish their work, or have to spend their lunchtime getting help from the teacher.

For some students, the effort that it takes to look at and perceive the words on the page, to figure out words when reading, to formulate their thoughts, to write, or to understand and organize math is so great that they dread those kinds of tasks and begin to avoid them at all costs.

Repeatedly, I hear from parents, I just want my happy child back!  I want him to feel confident.  I want her to love learning and feel like she can do anything.

Increase in confidence is one of the first changes that we see with students as we begin to develop the weak underlying skills that are at the root of their learning challenges!

Success in reading, writing, spelling, math and all those academic subjects taught in school, rests in large part on many different underlying learning/processing skills that allow the brain to get and organize the information needed for learning.  It has been traditionally believed that if you have dyslexia, learning challenges, or attention problems, you just have to learn to live with them – to compensate or get around them.

The truth is that most learning and attention challenges can be dramatically improved or completely corrected by first identifying and developing the underlying skills that are not supporting the learner well enough, and then remediating the affected basic academic skills.  We have see this thousands of times over the last 30 years and the brain research in the last 25 years has proven that the brain can be retrained.  Our bright but struggling students do not have to hate school or resort to coping strategies to survive it.

Does your child struggle with learning or attention? Hate school?  Avoid learning tasks?

JOIN US for a FREE Parent Information Night to learn how this can change.

Click here for details and RSVP: http://learningdisability.com/parent-info-night/.

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

7 Myths and the Truth About Learning Challenges

Briana Hurst ADD / ADHD, Anxiety, Asperger’s Syndrome, Attention, Auditory Processing, Autistic Spectrum, Classroom, Comprehension, Core Learning Skills, Developmental delays, Dysgraphia, Dyslexia, Executive Function, General Information, Homeschool, Homework, IEP, Learning disabilities, Math and Dyscalculia, Primitive Reflexes, Processing Speed, Reading, School, Sensory Processing, Social Skills, Spelling, Sports, Writing 0 Comments

Myth #1:  People with learning challenges just aren’t that smart.

Truth:  By definition, students with learning disabilities have average to above average intelligence.  This is why it is so frustrating and confusing for all involved when otherwise typical students struggle in school

Myth #2:  Students who struggle in school are just lazy.

Truth:  After multiple failures, a student may give up, but in my experience, laziness is NEVER the real reason for the struggle.

Myth #3:  They just don’t care.  They’re not motivated.

Truth:  Students who struggle may adopt an attitude of boredom or not caring, but they care deeply and would not choose to fail if they had the skills to do the job.

Myth #4:  If you’re not diagnosed with a learning disability, ADHD, or dyslexia, you don’t have a problem.

Truth:  Research indicates that 30% of the population has some degree of difficulty with the auditory skill that supports reading.  Only 5 – 9% actually get diagnosed as having a learning disability.  That leaves about 20% of students undiagnosed but struggling to some degree.

Myth #5:  With time, students will grow out of a learning challenge.

Truth:  In most cases, this simply is not true.  Children with learning challenges may become better at hiding or compensating for their challenges, but time alone does not eliminate the problems.

Myth #6:  The best way to deal with a learning challenge is to work around it; to learn to compensate for it.

Truth: Neuroscience research has proven that the brain can change. It is a crime to assume that these high potential children and adults must spend their lives compensating for their challenges.  The brain, and therefore learning challenges, can change.

Myth #7:  A learning problem is a permanent condition

Truth:  Brain research in the last 3 decades has proven that with targeted and intensive cognitive training, the brain can develop new, more efficient, and permanent connections for learning and processing information.

 

If you know or work with someone with a learning or attention challenge, here are 2 events for you:

Parent Information Night Learn why some smart kids struggle and what can be done to change it permanently.  Click here for details and RSVP: http://learningdisability.com/parent-info-night/.

 

SLC Grand Re-opening:  Stowell Learning Center Irvine

April 22, 2017 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

  • Try out cutting-edge techniques our students use
  • Tour our beautiful new facility
  • Special activities for kids / childcare
  • Student art display
  • Scholarship drawings and raffle
  • Free FOOD Truck Lunch

SIMULATIONS:  Experience what it feels like to have dyslexia, auditory processing, or attention challenges

SPEAKER:  Jill Stowell

7 Myths and the Truth About Learning Challenges:

Understanding and Supporting Struggling Students

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers

What’s it Feel Like to Be Me?

Briana Hurst ADD, ADD / ADHD, ADHD, Attention, Auditory Processing, Classroom, Development, Dysgraphia, Dyslexia, Executive Function, General Information, Homeschool, Homework, IEP, Learning Disability, Math and Dyscalculia, Reading, School 0 Comments

I think everyone has times when they just wish someone could step into their shoes and really understand how they feel.

I have a feeling our students with learning and attention challenges may feel this way a lot.  When they are told to try harder, and they’re already trying as hard as they can, it’s got to be frustrating.

Because the end product takes so long to complete or has so many more errors than expected, it may seem like they are not trying their best.   Often, nothing could be further from the truth.

Kids with learning challenges often put out an excessive amount of effort and energy to do tasks that their peers do easily.

Students with attention challenges may get up each morning determined to pay attention and get their work done and turned in on time, only to get to the end of the day and find first period’s homework still in the backpack and the materials needed for tonight’s homework still at school.

In spite of best intentions, intelligence, motivation, and effort, students with learning and attention challenges often disappoint themselves, their parents, and their teachers.

On Saturday April 22, 2017 at 10:00  – 10:40 a.m. and 1:00  – 1:40 p.m. we will be giving parents, professionals, and anyone interested in broadening their understanding, a chance to WALK IN THEIR SHOES.

Come see what it feels like to have dyslexia, an auditory processing disorder, or an attention challenge.  Gain new insight into your child, student, or patient who experiences these challenges.  This eye-opening experience will allow you to:

  • Change your approach to students with learning or attention challenges
  • Make you more effective in dealing with schoolwork and homework
  • Diminish the frustration that both you and your student feel

“This was a very valuable experience. It became clear to me why a child with attention issues might misbehave.  I couldn’t imagine having to cope with this type of frustration on a daily basis.”           –Parent

 

If you know or work with someone with a learning or attention challenge, here are 2 events for you:

Parent Information Night:  Learn why some smart kids struggle and what can be done to change it permanently.  Click here for details and RSVP: http://learningdisability.com/parent-info-night/.

SLC Grand Re-opening: 

  • Try out cutting-edge techniques our students use
  • Tour our beautiful new facility
  • Special activities for kids
  • Student art display
  • FOOD Truck Lunch

10:00  – 10:40 a.m. and 1:00  – 1:40 p.m.

SIMULATIONS Experience what it feels like to have dyslexia, auditory processing, or attention challenges

11:20 a.m.  – 12N and 1:20  – 2 p.m.

SPEAKER:  Jill Stowell

7 Myths and the Truth About Learning Challenges:

Understanding and Supporting Struggling Students

 

 

“Helping smart but struggling students dramatically improve or completely correct their learning and attention challenges by developing the underlying learning skills that are not supporting the learner well enough.”
We serve children and adults with diagnosed or undiagnosed learning and attention challenges including learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADHD, auditory processing disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
Jill Stowell, M.S.
Author:  At Wit’s End A Parent’s Guide to Ending the Struggle, Tears, and Turmoil of Learning Disabilities
Founder and Executive Director – Stowell Learning Centers